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The 411 on Blurry Vision


Is your vision not as clear as it once was? Blurry vision is a common symptom for a number of conditions, so don't just chalk it up to age or needing new glasses. But what exactly is blurred vision, what causes it, and how can you avoid it? Here's what you should know.

What Is Blurry Vision?

If your vision is blurry, it's hard to see fine details close up or far away. People suffering from blurred vision often complain about the inability to differentiate between objects and see fine detail clearly, and they experience difficulty reading, reports the College of Optometrists in Vision Development. Depending on the cause, blurred vision can arise in one or both eyes.

Causes of Vision Blurring

According to the Eye Institute, blurry vision can be a particular issue or can be caused by other related diseases, disorders, or conditions. While most cases of blurred vision are caused by common conditions of the eyes, blurred vision can also be attributed to neurological and autoimmune disorders. The following eye problems are the most common causes of blurry vision.

  • Tired eyes: Prolonged reading and electronic device usage, as well as improper rest, can cause the eyes to become fatigued and strained, leading to blurred vision.
  • Dry eyes: Dry eyes are uncomfortable and occur when your eyes don't produce enough tears or produce poor quality tears causing burning, itching, and blurry vision.
  • Cataracts: Usually seen in older people, a cataract is the clouding of the lens in the eye causing cloudy or blurred vision.
  • Diabetic retinopathy: A condition related to diabetes where high blood sugar levels can cause retina damage causing vision blurring.
  • Myopia: Myopia or nearsightedness, a common disorder affecting 30 percent of Americans, is an eye condition that causes objects at a distance to appear blurry due to too much cornea curvature, says the American Optometric Association.
  • Hyperopia: Hyperopia or farsightedness is a common eye condition that causes objects at a distance to look clear while close-up objects look blurry.
  • Migraines: Some people experience blurring and other vision changes before the beginning of a migraine or severe headache.
  • Other eye conditions: Glaucoma, astigmatism, or macular degeneration can cause blurring of vision.
  • Medications: Temporary blurring of vision is a side effect of some prescription drugs. Consult your doctor if this is bothersome or interrupts your daily function.

Vision that is blurry isn't something to blink at. If you're experiencing blurred vision or any other changes to your sight, have your eyes checked by your doctor immediately. Most of the time, blurry vision can be prevented or corrected. Regular eye examinations are the best method to protect your eyesight, especially if you have a health condition like diabetes or high blood pressure.

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